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September 2017 Newsletter

The Joy of New Beginnings
  by Amy Rever-Oberle, Band Director

 

Whether direct or indirect, there are many musical representations of the concept of “joy.” You can probably think of a few of either example quickly. Pieces or moments that you can’t help but smile. That raise the hair on the back of your neck. Maybe they even bring about stealthy onion chopping miscreants and you suddenly find yourself with teary eyes. Sometimes, all of these things hit you at once.

I’d like to submit another example of pure (cacophonous) musical joy though. (Not recommended for listening through headphones!) This is a combination of the very first sounds a new generation of musicians made together on their mouthpiece last week. 

These same students are the ones who listened in disbelief as I explained that the musicians playing on the orchestral pops station I had as background music on Day 1, had their very own Day 1 of playing their instrument. Those musicians had to learn that your hands face two different ways when playing flute or that the flat side of the reed matches with the flat side of the mouthpiece. It’s awfully hard to imagine yourself playing your favorite movie music or a famous theme you recognize when you don’t know how to open your case without dumping your instrument on the floor yet.

I had the good fortune to join a community based ensemble of music professionals this year. It was a great reminder of the joy to be found when sitting on the other side of a baton, but it was also a reminder of how much I needed to practice! I constantly oscillated between being thrilled to perform a few pieces I’d still never played (Hello, Suite of Old American Dances and First Suite in Eb!) and desperately not wanting to embarrass myself in front of my very talented colleagues.

Just like millions before them, these students will feel that same special joy and thrill while playing Hot Cross Buns for the first time as I did playing some of my favorites or that you have experiencing yours. They haven’t yet hit the point where they’re hypercritical of every detail of their sound though, mostly because they don’t know better. They’re just playing their instruments and having fun!

Because my start on flute was not one anybody would connect with anything joyful in relation to music, I often share my early experiences with my students. As a fourth grader, I was one of the youngest in an after school enrichment program and didn’t have band yet as a part of my regular school day. This meant that I was very behind my much more seasoned 5th and 6th grade friends and it lead to a lot of frustration and tears, including in front of said friends at practice. It was weeks before I could find the sweet spot on my flute without a mirror, individual coaching from my teacher, and many more frustrated tears. Once it clicked though, I was off and running, and when it was shared with me that band teachers get to (not have to) learn all of the instruments, I was hooked!

Though we may have different connections to music now, the fact remains that whether our joy in music comes from being a performer, teacher, enthusiast, or a combination of all of the above, we all had a Day 1. In honor of this next front of up and coming musicians, it would be wonderful to hear some of your early stories! Please share in the comments or add your story to our digital wall, and help inspire the newest generation of instrumentalists!

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After earning her Bachelor’s in Music Education from Wayne State University, Amy spent seven years as the K-12 Band and Music teacher in a rural district before moving to her current position as the 6th-8th Band Teacher at Hart Middle School in Rochester Hills, MI. She earned her Master’s Degree in Educational Leadership from Oakland University in 2015 and is currently in her tenth year of teaching. Amy has shared about social media and technology use at the Michigan Music and ArtsFirst! Conferences. When not teaching, talking about teaching, or learning about teaching, Amy enjoys spending time with her family and walking their two rescue mutts. She also blogs semi-regularly on her site The Noisy Room Down the Hall. You can connect with Amy on Twitter too @amylynnrever.

July 2017 Newsletter

An Interview with Jeffery Zook 

                   by Heather Neuenschwander 

 

On a perfect 75 degree late summer morning in Michigan, I recently had the honor of sitting down with the talented and charming Jeffery Zook, flutist and piccoloist with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra since 1992. I looked out upon the beautiful, perfectly manicured garden in the backyard of his home The Cambridge Conservatory, sipped a delicious cup of coffee he had so generously offered me, played with his adorable miniature pinscher Dexter, and thoroughly enjoyed some friendly conversation. Anyone who has had the privilege of spending time with this distinguished musician will speak of his friendly demeanor, sincere generosity, good-spirited humor, and most of all his passion for music. After a bit of catching up we discussed his upcoming performance at the 2017 NFA Convention in Minneapolis. 

 

HN: Tell me about the composition.

JZ: OK, so I guess it was a year ago I got an email from the program coordinator for the NFA asking me if I would be willing to appear at the Gala Concert on Saturday night at this convention playing this particular piece the Egil Hovland Concerto for Piccolo and String Orchestra. I had no idea what this piece was so I clicked on the YouTube link that he sent me. It’s been recorded on YouTube by this wonderful piccolo player Nadia Guenet. So I clicked on the link and I was instantly excited. I really was like “Wow, what a beautiful piece.  What a great showcase for the piccolo.” And I didn’t know it so I thought this was something I could really sink my heart in for the performance.

 

HN: Tell me more about the style of the piece.

JZ: It was written in 1980. When I first listened to it I thought it was very folksy and it turns out that this composer is known for a wide range of styles and this style is called Norwegian Romanticism. Which obviously means he uses a folk tune basis for the melodies and the harmonies. 

 

HN: Have you faced any challenges in preparing this concerto?

JZ: It’s very beautiful and melodic and very simple in a lot of ways but then all of a sudden he gets highly virtuosic just for short periods of time so I’m just slowing working up runs, making sure they’re in my fingers that kind of stuff but no it’s actually it’s a pretty straight forward piece.

I performed the first movement with pianist Rudolf Ozolins at Sharon Sparrow’s flute retreat recital a couple weeks ago. 

 

HN: Once you get to the convention how much time do you have to work with the string orchestra?

JZ: I think I get a rehearsal with them for an hour and a half on the first day of the convention on Thursday and then a run through maybe on the day of the performance. It’s a pickup from the Minnesota Orchestra and the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra conducted by Ransom Wilson.

 

HN: So you’ve already presented the first movement, do you have anything planned to present the other movements leading up to the final performance?

JZ: Probably while I’m on tour I’ll play it for my colleagues like Roma (Duncan, guest piccoloist from the Minnesota Orchestra and a former student). I told her I’d play it for her. So I’ll be practicing for the next three weeks in my hotel room. That’s the challenge of it is that for the next three weeks I’m going to be traveling all over Asia with the DSO, in Japan and China living in hotel rooms and I have to stay focused and concentrate on this so I’m going to be every day practicing it but like I said I will get little mini-run throughs when I can. When we’re at a hall or something like that.

 

HN: How does that affect preparing your music for the symphony while you’re on tour?

JZ: Oh I already know that.

 

HN: (Laughing) What are you playing? All pieces you’ve done many times before?

JZ: No actually because I’m playing assistant principal flute on tour so I’m playing a different part totally. For example, Roma’s playing principal piccolo part on the Copland symphony and I’m playing the second piccolo part next to her. She was my student at one point so she said it kind of feels a little weird sitting first piccolo next to me but it’s very special having her sitting next to me sounding beautiful on the solos and me supporting her from the second piccolo. So it’s kind of new for me to play that part. Other than the Copland Symphony number 3, they’re playing Tchaikovsky’s 4th Symphony and after having played it like a million times I don’t have to even be on stage for it!

 

HN: So you’re mainly playing flute on tour and then coming back and playing a piccolo concerto?

JZ: Right.

 

HN: Interesting. But for you that’s nothing, right?

JZ: (gesturing) Pfft. I’ve done it a million times.

 

HN: What are you most looking forward to at NFA this year?

JZ: One of the things I’m looking forward to is the Ervin Monroe tribute concert. I will be performing with Sharon Sparrow, Amanda Blaikie, and Brandon LePage in a quartet. We are doing a surprise piece that I found on YouTube. 

I remember my first convention I went to in 1982 when I was in high school. Ervin Monroe was the presenter at that convention. I’d never been to a convention before, It was here in Detroit. So it’s kind of cool that at this convention he’s being honored all these years later after having been my teacher and also my colleague in the orchestra for several years.

 

HN: Is there anything else you’re looking forward to at the convention?

JZ: I think I’ll just be practicing and getting ready for my concerto.

 

HN: What’s been the most enjoyable part of working up this concerto?

JZ: I am really enjoying learning a new language. You know I’m not very familiar with the music of Norway other than Edvard Grieg or something like that and I understand that this is a very coveted composer for Norway. He’s one of the most prolific composers and I’d never heard of him. So I’m really enjoying learning something new.

 

HN: Is there anything specifically that the audience should look for when they come to watch you play this wonderful piece of music?

JZ: I have a new suit.

 

HN: Ooh I’m glad I asked. Tell me about your new suit.

JZ: (Laughing) I don’t know. I still have to buy it.  That will be in that eight day period between returning from the tour and leaving for the convention. I was supposed to get to it this week but I didn’t do it.

 

HN: So you rush back from Asia and you’re jet-lagged and you’re going to be buying a new suit, preparing a concerto, and heading to Minnesota.

JZ: That’s all I’ve got to do. Simple.

 

HN: Easy… 

       So is there anything else you’d like to share about this upcoming performance?

JZ: When I got the e-mail a year ago I was really shocked and honored. I remember going to the Gala Concert in 1982 and being blown away by these great soloists. I never thought that I would be on the gala concert.

 

Jeffery Zook has been a member of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra flute section since 1992. His formal musical studies began at the Interlochen Arts Academy and continued at the University of Michigan. In 1988, he received the coveted Recitalists’ Diploma from the Royal Academy of Music in London. His teachers have included William Bennett, Trevor Wye, Judith Bentley, Jacqueline Hofto and former DSO piccoloist Clement Barone.

A prizewinner in many competitions, including the National Flute Association Young Artists Competition and William Byrd National Concerto Competition in Flint, Michigan, Mr. Zook has also been awarded of a grant from the National Endowment for the Advancement of the Arts. In August 2012, Mr. Zook performed and taught at the National Flute Association’s annual convention in Las Vegas.

Mr. Zook lives in Pleasant Ridge with his partner David Assemany and miniature pinscher Dexter. They have named their renovated Dutch Colonial home The Cambridge Conservatory a venue which has hosted recitals, workshops, musical feasts and fundraisers.

 

 

 

Heather Neuenschwander has a Master’s Degree in Flute Performance from Oakland University and a Bachelor's Degree in Music Education from Wayne State University. Before beginning her degree at Oakland, she taught middle school and high school band, choir and music appreciation in Michigan and Illinois for five years. She has performed with the Oakland Symphony Orchestra directed by Dr. Gregory Cunningham and the Michigan Philharmonic Orchestra under the direction of Nan Washburn. She has also performed in masterclasses for Marina Piccinini, Laurie Sokoloff, Nicola Mazzanti, Jennifer Clippert, Sharon Sparrow, and Jeffery Zook. In February 2015, Heather performed the Ibert Concerto with the Oakland Symphony Orchestra as a winner of the David Daniels Young Artist Concerto Competition. She also received the Matilda Award for Outstanding Graduate Student in Instrumental Performance in 2015. Heather currently resides in Royal Oak with her husband Josh and her sons Alex and Zach.



June 2017 Newsletter

 

 

A Flutist’s Summer Reading List

 


By David Buck

 

Principal Flute, Detroit Symphony Orchestra

 

 

  

There’s nothing better than relaxing with a good book on a lazy summer afternoon. As an avid reader, I look forward to the summer every year because I know I’ll finally have time for the books I’ve missed out on during the busy winter season. I have met many musicians who enjoy reading as much as I do, but surprisingly few who go out of their way to read books about music. The great conductor James DePriest summed up the attitude of many performing musicians towards the field of musicology when he said, “Writing about music is a little like dancing about architecture.” In other words, it doesn’t really make that much sense. 

 

For performance majors at colleges and conservatories, having enough time to practice is so important that reading assignments from music theory and history classes often seem to be not only irrelevant, but an actual hindrance. Like many of my classmates, I struggled to understand the importance of the courses I had to take as an undergrad for my own goals as an aspiring orchestral musician. I wanted to find a job, and in reality, you don’t need to know very much about music history or theory in order to win an audition. “You’ve played an impressive final round and we’d love to offer you a position with the orchestra, but first, could you please discuss the liturgical reforms made at the Council of Trent in 1545?” There aren’t many certainties in life, but I can guarantee that you will never hear these words at a professional audition. 

 

So why am I telling you to spend the summer reading a bunch of books when you could be spending those valuable hours practicing instead? There is no question that practicing is the single biggest factor in determining your success as a musician. However, one of the most important lessons I’ve learned since graduating from music school is that artistic success and professional success are not the same things. In the long run, striving for artistic growth will take you much further than pursuing professional achievement. Why? Because becoming an artist is a project for your entire life, and it demands far more than the task of finding employment.

 

One of the most critical ingredients for artistic growth is the ability to question the assumptions that we make every day as performers – assumptions about how to practice, how to use the advice of our teachers, and why we even play music in the first place. Practicing can be quite useless if it’s done without thought. To achieve artistic growth, it’s crucial for our minds to be engaged when we’re in the practice room. Thoughtful practice requires a nuanced understanding of the composer’s intentions, a clear vision of our own artistic goals, and a detailed plan to solve the technical challenges of the work at hand. This is no small task. Bringing a musical composition to life requires a great deal of knowledge, exploration, and creativity, and that is why reading about music is uniquely important: it will help you to broaden your perspective as an interpreter and to discover musical possibilities you could never have imagined on your own.

 

To that end, I have compiled a summer reading list with the flutist in mind. This list is admittedly eclectic, but that is exactly the point. The goal is to encourage flutists to improve their musicianship by learning from great artists of the past, from musicians who play other instruments, from literature and history more broadly—and to find ways of relating the challenges we face in the practice room to larger artistic issues. Each of these works has been important for my own development as a musician, and my hope is that these volumes will help readers to find new inspirations and solutions, both this summer and beyond.

 

1) Kincaidiana: A Flute Player’s Notebook by John C. Krell

William Kincaid was the Philadelphia Orchestra’s brilliant principal flutist for forty years. A founding faculty member at the Curtis Institute of Music, almost every American flutist can trace his or her lineage back to Kincaid. His students include luminaries like Julius Baker, Doriot Anthony Dwyer, Joseph Mariano, and former Detroit Symphony Orchestra flutists Albert Tipton, Clement Barone, and Robert Patrick. John Krell used his notes from lessons with Kincaid as the basis for this comprehensive treatise about the essentials of good flute playing.

 

2) Casals and The Art of Interpretation by David Blum

Many people are surprised to learn that I have a secret past as a cellist. I don’t play the cello anymore, but I learned a great deal from the recordings and repertoire I discovered during ten years of cello lessons. One thing I will never forget is hearing Pablo Casals play Bach for the first time. Grainy though the recording quality may be, his 1936-39 performances of Bach’s six Cello Suites capture something essential about music’s ability to communicate emotion. David Blum’s thoughtful summary of the great cellist’s approach to musicianship and phrasing is indispensible. 

 

3) The Early Flute: A Practical Guide by Rachel Brown

Rachel Brown is one of the world’s foremost Baroque flute experts. The Early Flute is an ideal companion for modern flutists interested in developing historically informed interpretations of Baroque and Classical repertoire. Brown draws on a wide range of treatises by Quantz, Hotteterre, Devienne, and many others in this accessible and essential work.

  

4) Sound in Motion by David McGill

David McGill has had the rare distinction of holding principal bassoon positions with both the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Cleveland Orchestra. McGill was strongly influenced by the pedagogy of Marcel Tabuteau, often regarded as the father of American oboe playing. In Sound in Motion, he delves into Tabuteau’s philosophy of music and his often misunderstood “number” system. A wonderful introduction to the art of phrasing, McGill’s erudition is evident on every page. 

 

5) On Playing the Flute by Johann Joachim Quantz.  

Perhaps the greatest flutist of the 18th century, Quantz worked alongside C.P.E. Bach for twenty-six years at the court of Frederick the Great. A critical resource for musicologists, there is no better primary source for flutists hoping to gain insight into the musical language of the Baroque. 

 

6) A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare

I first studied the Scherzo from Mendelssohn’s Incidental Music to A Midsummer Night’s Dream in high school with my wonderful teacher, David Cramer. After I was finally able to negotiate the technical difficulties of the solo, David asked me to imagine being in a forest, with twigs and leaves underfoot, and to find a tone color and crispness of articulation that would give listeners the sense of being lost in the woods in the middle of Shakespeare’s play. There is no question that reading Shakespeare’s masterpiece will enhance your appreciation of Mendelssohn’s music—and vice versa!

 

7) Daphnis and Chloe by Longus

Every flutist knows the colorful Pantomime solo from Maurice Ravel’s ballet Daphnis and Chloe. The original Daphnis and Chloe, however, is an ancient Greek poem about the romance between an innocent young shepherd and shepherdess. A humorous and touching coming-of-age story, this work is immensely helpful for understanding the inspiration and context of Ravel’s ballet. (Note: Daphnis and Chloe deals with adult subject matter and is not appropriate for younger readers.)

 

8) Salome by Oscar Wilde 

Salome is one of the most iconic femme fatales in all of opera, and the sultry flute solo from her “Dance of the Seven Vails” has become famous in its own right. Richard Strauss based Salome on a short play by the Irish writer Oscar Wilde, which was based in turn on the biblical story of the death of John the Baptist. Although these events are mentioned only briefly in the New Testament, Wilde’s play is a grotesque psychological drama that plumbs the darkest reaches of the human psyche. Perhaps it’s not the best book to read right before bed. (Note: Salome deals with violent and disturbing subject matter, and it too is not appropriate for younger readers.)

 

9) Mozart: A Life by Maynard Solomon

There are so many terrific biographies of composers that the genre really deserves a reading list of its own, but I couldn’t resist including Maynard Solomon’s masterful biography of Mozart on my list. This deeply honest portrait explores the composer’s complex relationship with his father and the challenges he faced as he struggled to make his way in the world.

 

10) The Inextinguishable Symphony by Martin Goldsmith

The Inextinguishable Symphony is the true story of two young musicians who grew up in Germany during the dark years before the outbreak of WWII. Gunther, a flutist, and Rosalie, a violist, were both members of the so-called Jüdischer Kulturbund, an orchestra of Jewish musicians that performed at the whim of Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels during the 1930s. After unspeakable hardships, the two ultimately make their way to safety in the United States. A tragic yet inspiring testament to the power of music and love.

 

 


Praised by The Oregonian for his "supple tone, rhythmic dynamism and technical agility,” David Buck joined the Detroit Symphony Orchestra as Principal Flute in 2012. He previously held positions with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the Oregon Symphony, and has made guest principal appearances with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and the Baltimore Symphony.

As a soloist, Mr. Buck has performed with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Detroit Chamber Winds & Strings and the Oregon Symphony, collaborating with conductors including Leonard Slatkin, John Storgårds, Paul Watkins and H. Robert Reynolds. In 2014, he recorded John Williams' rarely heard Concerto for Flute and Orchestra with Maestro Slatkin and the Detroit Symphony for Naxos Records.

During the summer months, Mr. Buck has appeared at the Great Lakes Chamber Music Festival, Oregon Bach Festival, Colorado Music Festival, Tanglewood, Kent/Blossom, Spoleto Festival del Due Monde in Spoleto, Italy and the Pacific Music Festival in Sapporo, Japan. He is a member of the Detroit Chamber Winds & Strings and a former member of the LA Phil New Music Group.

David Buck is a graduate of The Juilliard School, where he earned his Bachelor of Music degree and Graduate Diploma. His primary teachers have been Robert Langevin, Jeffrey Khaner, Jeanne Baxtresser and David Cramer. A native of Philadelphia, Mr. Buck lives in Royal Oak, Michigan with his wife, flutist Jung-Wan Kang.

May 2017 Newsletter

Volunteer at the NFA Annual Convention

By Kate Blair

 

The NFA is looking for volunteers to help out at the 45th Annual NFA Convention. In case you’re not familiar with the convention, it’s a four-day event packed with everything flute, including performances, workshops, masterclasses, presentations, a flute industry trade show, and much more. It’s an inspiring event that leaves attendees invigorated and ready to put all their new knowledge to work in performance, teaching, or whatever their passion may be. This year, the event takes place August 10-13 at the Minneapolis Convention Center, and we are very excited about it!

For months now, we’ve been gearing up for the convention, finalizing events and tweaking the schedule, but we could really use your help to make sure things run as smoothly as possible on the ground. Volunteers can help us out with crucial tasks that ensure the convention runs smoothly and that everyone is having a good time. Even taking on one shift can go a long way in helping us make the convention a fantastic experience that everyone can enjoy! 

It’s not all about us, though. There’s plenty in it for you if you volunteer! Interested? Read on! 

 

Why volunteer for the convention? 

You get a chance to give back to the NFA and see firsthand what goes on behind the scenes at the largest and most anticipated annual flute event in the world! On top of that, convention attendees can also receive cash vouchers to help offset convention costs. For every three events you volunteer, the NFA will thank you with a voucher redeemable for $10. Plus, you’ll have a chance to meet other volunteers who are equally passionate about supporting the flute community! 

How does it work?

The volunteering schedule registration takes place online to provide maximum flexibility and convenience. You get to choose when and for which events you volunteer! There’s no limit to the number of events you can take on, and you can sign up for as many (or as few) shifts as you’d like. As a volunteer, you will still have plenty of time to attend concerts and workshops, visit the exhibit hall, or simply enjoy the city!  

What positions are available?

There are many options, including door monitors, page turners, stage crew assistants, and competition runners. Since a significant number of attendees are international visitors, the NFA is also looking for volunteers that can provide language interpretation services. If you are fluent in Spanish or an East Asian language, we could especially use your help! Let us know what your abilities are, and we’ll be in touch. 

Who can volunteer?

Anyone can volunteer! You don’t even need to be a flutist as long as you’re enthusiastic about helping out. Your non-flutist friends and/or significant others are welcome to volunteer as well! (Visit the volunteering page on the NFA website to read a Q&A with veteran volunteer Sam Louke, a trombonist who has become a familiar face at NFA conventions). However, only those registered for the convention are eligible to receive cash vouchers. 

How to Get Started

You can indicate your interest in volunteering by checking the appropriate box during your convention registration, and we will follow up with you soon with more details. 

Looking Ahead to 2018

Not attending the convention this year? It’s never too soon to start thinking about the 46th Annual Convention in Orlando, Florida! If you’re a student, you may also want to consider applying for a convention internship next year. Convention interns work hands on with the Equipment Chair, Convention Director, and Membership Manager and will receive a behind-the-scenes perspective of convention operations and planning. It’s a great way to gain workplace skills and make new connections! 

 

Please contact Volunteer Coordinator Townes Osborn Miller with any questions or visit the volunteering page on the NFA website learn more. We hope you’ll consider lending a hand this summer, but either way, we look forward to seeing you in Minneapolis (or a future convention)!

 

We hope you’ll consider lending a hand at the convention this summer, but either way, we look forward to seeing you in Minneapolis! 

Easter Egg Hunt 2017

Spring 2017 Newsletter

Native Flutes and Extended Techniques

 

By Alberto Almarza

 

"Music is the sum total of scattered forces… it has been turned into a speculative song! I much prefer the notes coming from the flute of an Egyptian shepherd: he contributes to the landscape and hears harmonies ignored by our treatises…"

Claude Debussy, 1901

 

The flute is one of the most varied and widespread instruments in the world, going back tens of thousands of years in many societies. As a result of the multiple types of flutes and the diversity of their musical and social role throughout the world, an amazing repertoire of timbres and playing techniques have been developed, preserved by flute players of native cultures. Many of these techniques arose from the desire to evoke nature, imitating birdsongs, wind and water. Others came into being as an attempt to produce sounds that would have healing powers and communicate with sacred spirits.

The following is a list of some of the most common extended techniques and examples of their use in world flute music.

 

Circular pan flute, Thailand Ritualdouble recorder, Mexico

 

 

  Multiphonics: technique that allows the flutist to produce several          sounds simultaneously. The fascination with multiple sounds is as old as the flute itself. From double to sextuple flutes, they can be found everywhere.

  This circular pan flute from Thailand and a double recorder from Mexico are good examples of instruments designed to produce chords.

 

 

 

  

      Circular Breathing: breathing and blowing at the same time. A technique which is thousands of years old and common throughout the world, it has only recently been introduced to Western music. In addition to the flute, it is used by many other wind instruments.

 

Bansuri,  India

 

 

 

Microtones: refers to the use of intervals smaller than a half step. With the exception of the Western modern flute, every other flute in the world is designed as a non-tempered instrument and uses microtonal intervals for tuning and playing.

 

An elegant example is the Indian transverse flute Bansuri. The player uses the middle segment of his fingers to cover the holes, rotating the fingers to bend the pitch.

 

 

 

 

 

  

Ceremonial vessel flute, Mexico

 

 

 

 

 

Whistle Tones: produced by blowing extremely slow air into the flute. Again, we find many instruments that were especially made to create very soft, high-pitched notes.

A notable example is this ceremonial flute/sculpture from Mexico.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ney , Iran

 

 

 

 

Color Variation: includes “airy tone,” “white sound,” “reed sound,” singing and playing, etc. All of these sounds and techniques can be found in many different traditions of flute playing.

The Persian Ney, one of the oldest known flutes, is one example of an instrument designed to produce a remarkable array of different colors.

 

 

 

 

  

To summarize, most of what we refer to as "extended techniques" in Western flute music have been part of traditional music from around the world for thousands of years. It is only recently that we have begun to acknowledge the enormous influence of world music on our own Classical tradition. As we explore the relationship between music of the world and contemporary Western music, we discover that we are not isolated; rather, our music has been enriched by that of other cultures. Flutists and composers today are enhancing our musical experience by drawing from this remarkable palette of sounds and techniques and, in the process, demonstrate that the power of musical experience is universal.

 

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Alberto AlmarzaAlberto Almarza is Professor of Flute and Head of the Flute Department at Carnegie Mellon University, and former Principal Flute with the National Philharmonic Orchestra of Chile. He has performed and taught in the US, Latin America, Korea and Europe, and has recorded for New Albion, Elán, Albany, Centaur, and Naxos Records. He has appeared as soloist with Boston Modern Orchestra Project, Memphis Symphony, BachFest Chamber Orchestra, and the Philharmonic, National Symphony and National Chamber Orchestras of Chile, and the Arianna String Quartet among others. Most recently, he performed at a TED TALK Conference, and was featured on the PBS program Horizons.

He is the co-founder with Jeanne Baxtresser of The Consummate Flutist, and currently serves as its Artistic Director.

February 2017 Newsletter

Administrating, Artistically

By Jessica Dunnavant

 

When, as a teenager, I began to think about a life in music, I pictured my life revolving around performing, with maybe a little teaching on the side. That’s pretty much as far as my imagination went, and while my adult life and career do bear out those dreams in lots of ways, I could never have imagined all the work it takes behind the scenes to pull off any public artistic venture. Someone must set and maintain a budget, which sometimes involves fundraising. Someone must choose the program, gather and prepare the music, hire the musicians and communicate with them throughout the process. Someone must advertise and promote, create and print programs, be a liaison with the venue—all of that—and not one of those tasks involves learning, rehearsing or performing music. In my experience, it’s almost always the musicians themselves who end up filling those administrative roles, whether or not they would ordinarily choose to do so.

 

I can’t begin to count the number of times I’ve heard a musician cry off trying something because they don’t feel qualified to do it (meaning, often, something like this: “but my degree is in piano!”) But the truth, especially with small festivals and ensembles and societies, is that there is often no one else to do a thing. I certainly do not have an arts administration degree, but in the twelve years that have passed since I finished my DMA, I have been a grant writer, a fundraiser, and emcee, a PR writer, a graphic/web designer, a personnel manager, an event planner and at times even a caterer. I’ve trolled the IRS website for rules and regulations, and written and revised by-laws. I’ve learned Robert’s Rules of Order and presided over board and committee meetings. All that, and I have three degrees in flute performance. All that, and then on top of it also all the practicing, rehearsing and performing that I expected.

 

In truth, the most valuable skill you can have when you’re putting a toe into these waters is this: can you take a big project and turn it into small, manageable tasks? If you can do that, you can start a chamber ensemble, put on a festival and deal with the financial ramifications of existing as a business entity. Here are a few other ideas I have on how to get the job done.

 

 

  1. Discover your natural aptitudes. If public speaking is needed, are you comfortable doing that? I am a natural, card-carrying extrovert. Just give me a mic and an audience, and then hope I know when to shut up! If that’s not you, can you fake it? It’s really important to do this well, if you are the mouthpiece for your group, either on public media or live at concerts. When someone explains to the audience that their performances could never happen without generous donors, that someone needs to be able to look at the audience and radiate confidence and sincerity.
  2. About faking it: sometimes that’s what you’ve got to do. Does your group need bylaws? Are you planning to apply for 501(c)3 status or register with your secretary of state? Use the internet. There’s a lot of reliable information there, especially on irs.gov and your state’s secretary of state website. You may also have local resources that you know nothing about. Here in Nashville, we have a group called the Center for Nonprofit Management. They are a fount of information, offering courses and networking and even a jobs website for those looking for full or part time employment in the nonprofit sector.
  3. Use your passion! The person who speaks for any organization ought to be someone who is passionate about it. Likewise, the person who plans the small details of a concert, who designs the promo posters and promotes the Facebook posts, ought to be someone who legitimately cares deeply about the product or performance on display. Is there anything worse than listening to someone apathetically describe why the public should support an event? If you don’t care…why would anyone else? If it’s stressful to think of exposing your passion to strangers, just think of it as another performance. Write down exactly what you want to say and study it so that, in the moment, you won’t have to read it word for word. That sincerity and personal connection is still the most important thing.
  4. Know when to ask for help. Delegating tasks to other people is an invaluable skill. If there are specific things that need to be done, or larger more abstract roles, look around you and see the people you’ve got to work with. What are their aptitudes? And if no one is offering to help, that doesn’t mean they’re not willing. Just ask. 

 

One of the best parts of membership in a small ensemble or an association is that everyone matters. Every donor, every performer, everyone who comes in contact with your group has a role to play. I always say to donors and volunteers who are associated with one of my groups that if you want your donation and your time to matter, because of our small size, no one will ever appreciate you more than we will. That sense of community and belonging doesn’t just keep the musicians of the group together. It also keeps people coming to our concerts and volunteering their time to help us succeed. And in the end, isn’t that sense of community and belonging the best part of any event?

 

Flutist Jessica Dunnavant is a freelance musician and teacher. An early music specialist, she is a member of Music City Baroque and teaches Baroque flute at Middle Tennessee State University. She has performed and taught across the country, including academic appointments at Florida State University, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, and the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. As a modern flutist, she performs with the Jackson Symphony in West Tennessee and teaches a large, successful studio of pre-college students.

January 2017 Newsletter

Music, Healing and Our Communities:

  An Empowering Partnership

Michelle S. Lynch, PsyD, LP

Detroit Medical Orchestra

DMO Group Shot

 

Since its beginning in 2010, the Detroit Medical Orchestra’s mission of “Bringing Healing Through Music” has been realized by presenting high-level symphonic performances in the heart of downtown Detroit performed by Detroit-area medical students, nurses, resident and attending physicians, allied-health professionals, professors/academics, and well as any other musicians who are passionate about the healing power of music. 

The orchestra members are all volunteers, giving generously of their time and musical talent. While the musicians come from a variety of different disciplines and backgrounds, they join together to exchange their instruments of their demanding professional and academic lives for those of musical instruments; to create the healing and soothing sounds of music to promote relaxation and rejuvenation not only for the listeners of their music, but also for the musicians themselves.  Performances featuring the full 70+ member orchestra that are part of the Detroit Medical Orchestra’s official concert season are always free and open to all in the community; giving the gift of music to thousands of appreciative concert-goers over the past several years.  

The healing power of music is both historic and scientific.  In ancient times, the Greeks worshiped Apollo, a god for both music and medicine. Hippocrates, commonly called the “Father of Western Medicine,” is said to have played music for his patients (Haley, 2015).  Research has long supported that listening to classical music can increase relaxation, provide respite and relief from negative emotions and experiences, and relieve symptoms of both physical and mental health conditions. Classical music in particular has been found to have a variety of positive health effects such as reducing pain and anxiety, lowering blood pressure, reducing levels of the stress hormone cortisol, relieving insomnia, reducing healing times, increasing memory retrieval and improving communication (Adams 2102; Haley, 2015; Ifill, 2012; Mount 2004).  

Neuroscientists are working to further understand how music impacts brain functioning and have reported a number of advantages for musically-trained individuals.  Advantages that range from better verbal and mathematical skills to higher scores on tests of working memory, cognitive flexibility, and IQ (Dewar, 2014; Fujioka et al 2006; Schellenberg 2006; Patel and Iverson 2007; Hanna-Pladdy and Mackay 2011).   The positive and profound effects that music can have on the brain are not just limited to those creating the music, but extend to all who listen and enjoy it.

Exploring the connections between music and science has revealed fascinating insights on how brain functioning can be powerfully affected by music. Research in this area has led to investigations of the “Mozart effect” and experiments that have supported individuals having brief improvement in visual-spatial skills immediately after listening to a Mozart sonata (Dewar, 2014; Rauscher et al, 1993; Hetland, 2000). Neuroscientist - Daniel Levitin, author of This is your Brain on Music, emphasizes the connections between music and the brain and the powerful effects music has on the areas of the brain that store memory, influence emotion and produce a sense of satisfaction or pleasure (Levitin, 2007). Dr. Oliver Sacks, Professor of Clinical Neurology and Psychology at Columbia University Medical Center, explored the power of music on the brain and how memory, mood, and emotion are powerfully impacted by music.  His work with individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other severe neurological and physical problems illustrates the profound emotional impact and healing effect that the return of memories triggered by music can have on people’s lives (Sacks, 2008).   In his book, Awakenings, Dr. Sacks states, “The power of music to integrate and cure is quite fundamental. It is the profoundest nonchemical medication” (Sacks, 1999).

The National Institutes for Health (NIH) cites Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT), a form of speech-language and music-based therapy, as a helpful intervention in the recovery of expressive language skills with brain-injury patients (Haley, 2015).  This technique which utilizes melody and rhythm to help improve expressive language by tapping into non-damaged and preserved functional brain areas, such as those engaged in the areas of singing, helps stimulate and engage language-capable regions (Zumbansen et al, 2014).  This type of treatment aided Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords in her recovery, and by using Melodic Intonation Therapy she was able to sing what she was not able to say, and this has facilitated her speech recovery (Haley, 2015).  A number of regions in the brain are activated by listening to music.  Researchers believe that as we listen to music, the brain responds by creating new pathways and connections, and this can often have a significant positive impact around damaged or disconnected areas (Ifill, 2012). Music therapy is now being used as an intervention with a number of different difficulties, such as people suffering from early-onset dementia, kids with autism, as well as veterans who are coming back from war and trying to learn to walk without a limb.  A growing number of studies also suggest that music-based therapies can promote healing in several ways such as helping stroke patients regain speech, improve heart and respiratory rates and blood pressure, as well as reduce anxiety and pain in cancer and leukemia patients. (Ifill, 2012). 

As the brain processes music, it stimulates communication between left and right hemispheres. It is not surprising that many deep thinkers and scientists have enjoyed and benefited from the positive effects of this stimulation.  Albert Einstein was quoted as saying, “If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician.  I often think in music.  I live my daydreams in music.  I see my life in terms of music…I get most joy in life out of music.” Einstein started playing the violin when he was five and music was not only an outlet for his emotions, but the core of his creative life.  He was nourished by music and found particular inspiration in playing music written by Mozart (Miller, 2006). 

It is clear that music has the powerful potential to heal from within, our bodies and minds; however, this healing can extend outward by fostering positive connections with those around us and building a spirit of collaboration between members of our communities.  Jean Vanier writes in his book, Community and Growth, “One of the marvelous things about community is that it enables us to welcome and help people in a way we couldn't as individuals. When we pool our strength and share the work and responsibility, we can welcome many people, even those in deep distress, and perhaps help them find self-confidence and inner healing” (Vanier, 1989). At every concert, the Detroit Medical Orchestra promotes a Detroit-based health or community initiative/organization, increasing awareness to these groups and their missions through pre-concert talks to the audience and also collecting donations at the concert which go directly to these charities. In past concerts, we have supported free health clinics and community children’s programs, among others.  

The Detroit Medical Orchestra wishes to extend the healing power of music to the greater Detroit community by creating an experience through our free performances that not only brings people together; to revitalize rejuvenate, and inspire;  but also to support and build partnerships with community art, cultural, social and health initiatives.  Please visit the Detroit Medical Orchestra’s website, www.DetroitMedicalOrchestra.org for more information about the orchestra as well as a full listing of upcoming concert dates.

 

Michelle Lynch with FluteMichelle S. Lynch, Psy.D. is a graduate of Hope College, where she received a Bachelor’s degree with a double major of Psychology and Japanese Language.   Dr. Lynch completed her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (Psy.D.) at the Illinois School of Professional Psychology and completed her Internship through the Wayne State University Child/Adolescent Clinical Psychology Training Program. She is an alumnus of the Wayne State University School of Medicine and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship, during which time she received the Distinguished Pediatric Psychology Post-Doctoral Research Fellow Award in 2006.  She has held positions in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department through the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences at Wayne State University School of Medicine and the Child Research Division at Children’s Hospital of Michigan, prior to starting full-time private practice in 2006.  Dr. Lynch specializes in the treatment of children, adolescents and families experiencing emotional and behavior difficulties related to trauma, loss, violence, disaster or other psychologically overwhelming experiences.    

Dr. Lynch is thankful to have grown up in a family that strongly supported and encouraged music education.  It was at a community symphony concert as a young elementary school student where she experienced the excitement of first hearing a live classical music performance and felt the inspiration of wanting to start playing an instrument.  Shortly thereafter, she starting playing the flute and continued to do so through college.  After a hiatus from playing due to graduate school studies and post-graduate career activities, she had the good fortune of learning about the Detroit Medical Orchestra while attending a Detroit Symphony Orchestra concert.  Since joining the Detroit Medical Orchestra, she has rediscovered the joy, artistic energy and creative challenge that comes with playing and studying music. She is grateful to study under the flute instructorship of Carol Perkins. 

Dr. Lynch is passionate about being a musician with the Detroit Medical Orchestra as well as the orchestra’s current President of the Board of Directors, providing her the opportunity to contribute to the orchestra’s mission of bringing the healing power of music to the greater Detroit community through the Detroit Medical Orchestra’s free classical music performances. In addition to volunteering as the Detroit Medical Orchestra's President of the Board of Directors, Dr. Lynch is also an active member of the Detroit Public Television's Community Advisory Panel and serves on the Arts and Culture Subcommittee of the Detroit Public Television's Community Advisory Panel. 

 

REFERENCES

Adams, S. (2012, March 28). Classical Music improves Surgery.  Retrieved from:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/9169589/Classical-music-improves-surgery.html

Dewar, G.D. (2014). Music and Intelligence:  A Parent’s evidence-based guide.  Retrieved from:  http://www.parentingscience.com/music-and-intelligence.html#sthash.GIdUpWps.dpuf

Fujioka T., Ross B., Kakigi R., Pantev C., and Trainor L.J. (2006). One year of musical training affects development of auditory cortical-evoked fields in young children. Brain. 129 (Pt 10):2593-608 

Haley, A. (2015, January 19). Music Has Charms: The healing power of music therapy.  Retrieved from: http://www.whatsupmag.com/2015/01/19/59755/music-has-charms-the-healing-power-of-music-therapy

Hanna-Pladdy, B., Mackay, A. (2011). The relation between instrumental musical activity and cognitive aging. Neuropsychology. 2011, Apr 4.

Hetland, L. (2000). Listening to music enhances spatial-temporal reasoning: Evidence for the "Mozart effect." The Journal of Aesthetic Education, 34(3/4), 105--148. 

Ifill, G. (Interviewer) & Michels, S. (Interviewee). (2012). The Healing Power for Music [Interview transcript].  Retrieved from PBS NEWSHOUR:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/health-jan-june12-musictherapy_02-27/

Levitin, D.  (2007). This is Your Brain on Music:  The Science of a Human Obsession.  New York: Penguin Publishing. 

Miller, A.I. (2006, January 31). A Genius Finds Inspiration in the Music of Another.  Retrieved from: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/31/science/31essa.html?_r=1&

Mount, B.M. (2004, September 9). The Healing Power of Music.  Retrieved from: http://www.scena.org/lsm/sm10-1/guerisseur-musique-en.htm

Rauscher, F.H., Shaw, G.L. and Ky, K.N.. (1993). Music and spatial task performance. Nature, 365: 611.

Sacks, O. (1999). Awakenings. New York, Vintage Books.

Sacks, O. (2008).  Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain, Revised and Expanded Edition. New York, Vintage Books.

Schellenberg, E.G. (2006). Long-term positive associations between music lessons and IQ. Journal of Educational Psychology 98(2): 457-468. 

Schellenberg, E.G., Nakata, T., Hunter, P.G., and Tamota, S. (2007). Exposure to music and cognitive performance: tests of children and adults. Psychology of music, 35(1): 5-19.

Patel, A.D. and Iversen, J.R. (2007). The linguistic benefits of musical abilities. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 11:369-372. 

Vanier, J. (1989).  Community and Growth, 2nd Revised Edition. Mahwah, NJ, Paulist Press.

Zumbansen, A., Peretz, I., Hebert, S. (2014). Melodic Intonation Therapy: Back to Basics for Future Research.  Frontiers in Neurology, 5: 7

December 2016 Newsletter

6 Weeks to Finals

by Sharon Sparrow

 

“Wow, that was the best I’ve ever played!”

Those are the best 8 words strung together I can think of to define what success really means! So, after you’ve repeated them at least twice, let’s get to work and learn how to turn those words into your next audition or performance reality!

Preparation! No one, not even Yo-Yo Ma, could say those words with real belief without having put in the preparation time and steps necessary. Preparation begins with organization. When is your event? Does it involve a pianist? What music is required? Is memorization required? Once you have organized yourself, you can formulate a “success timeline”. Realistically give yourself enough time to feel completely secure and confident about a week before the actual event! Do NOT wait until the night before to feel completely ready. Preparing for a performance is like cooking a stew, after all the ingredients are in place, it needs a good deal of simmer time to taste it’s absolute best. 

I believe that total preparation is like a triangle with 3 equal sides to it. The side we are all most familiar with is the “Practice” side. We must put ample time into practicing for our event, which means concentrated time in our practice room, solidifying technique (by practicing slowly!), tone, intonation (using the tuner!), rhythm (using the metronome!) and putting our piece together musically. But don’t be fooled by thinking this is the ONLY side… you still have 2 sides of your triangle left to perform your best.

The second side is Mental Training, or getting your head in the right frame of mind to perform your best. There are several books available to help you with this, many found in the sports sections, as top athletes equally train their minds along with their bodies! Also, for this side, Positive talk is HUGE!  Every word you say, every thought, every post on Facebook must reflect your positive attitude about your audition. Discard saying things such as “Oh, I’m so nervous about this”. “This is going to be terrible”. “I always screw up that passage”. Replace those words and thoughts with “I’m so excited to share my piece with everyone.”  “I’ve worked really hard and know I’m going to play my best.”  “I really love playing this piece”. Believe it or not, your brain is like a recording device, and will remember, store, and spit back out at you all it has heard when it comes to crunch time. Which of those statements above do you want your brain telling you at your performance?!

The third side of the triangle involves Training for the Actual Event. We call this “mock auditioning”. Create several situations that mimic or are as similar as the event you are going to perform in. Gather up people to listen to you (friends, parents, peers, teddy bears, etc.) so that you have an “audience”. Set up your recording device, and then proceed as if it’s the actual event, from standing backstage or outside the room, to walking in, to tuning, to performing without stopping, to bowing (if applicable), to leaving the room. Keep a journal and jot down notes after each of your mocks, including your strengths, weaknesses, thoughts that ran through your head, etc. Each and every time you do this, you will improve significantly! By the time your actual event comes around, you will be a pro at this!! 

So, let’s talk about the word “success” for a moment. For me, playing my best certainly defines success. This is a “Performance Goal” rather than an “Outcome Goal”. Try to define the difference, and each time you play and even practice, devise a list of Performance Goals for yourself that are attainable. For example, “I’m going to enjoy this performance” is a Performance Goal. “I’m going to win this competition” is an “Outcome goal”.  “I’m going to give this performance 100 percent of my energy”. “I’m going to get a rating of 1 on this”. See the difference? Make your OWN list, and start repeating these to yourself before you play!

Unfortunately, there is no substitute for putting in the time and effort to completely prepare. IT TAKES TIME! It is worth the effort. Use your completed Triangle and you will be very happy with the results. It’s going to feel great to be able to say “Wow, that was the best I’ve ever played!” 

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Sharon Sparrow’s book “6 Weeks to Finals!” is a delightful and essential book on preparation and organization for any musical performance! Her tried and true methods have helped several musicians achieve goals they have spent years striving for. It is available at Flute Specialists, through Theodore Presser co., and also on Amazon. 

 

   Sharon Sparrow is the Assistant Principal Flute of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. She earned a Bachelor’s degree at The Juilliard School and a Master’s degree at Mannes College of Music. She has given master classes all over the world and locally is the Instructor of Flute at Oakland University and Wayne State University.

Sharon is a sought-after trainer for orchestral auditions on all instruments, and she has coached players who have won major jobs in orchestras throughout the US. Her specialty is helping musicians with their mindset, confidence and certainty through preparation so they can master the audition experience. 

Sharon Sparrow is a hands-on advocate for music education at all ages, and has hosted and written children’s shows for both the Detroit Symphony and the CutTime Players, based in Michigan. Sharon has been a concerto soloist and has held Principal positions with the Memphis Symphony, the Fort Wayne Philharmonic and the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. 

 

 

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